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Congratulations to Shane Sinclair from the University of Calgary on the receipt of a C17 Research Network grant targeted at conceptualizing and operationalizing compassion

Grant title: Conceptualizing and Operationalizing Compassion in Pediatric Oncology: The Development of a Patient, Family Member and Healthcare Provider Informed Theoretical Model

Lay abstract:  Compassion is a key component of high quality healthcare. While children and family members increasingly expect compassion and healthcare providers desire to provide it, providing and receiving compassion in the pediatric oncology settings is a growing challenge. Although Canadian Pediatric Society guidelines state that “It is essential that every team member…provide compassionate care that meets or exceeds parents’ expectations,” and the Hospice Palliative Care Association attests that “Pediatric hospice palliative care is provided by an interdisciplinary team of competent and compassionate formal caregivers who work collaboratively with the child and family,” no studies have defined and operationalized compassion within a pediatric setting.

This study will develop a clinically informed, patient and family centered, theoretical model of compassion from the perspective of children living within advanced cancer, their parents and healthcare providers. The aim of this study is to conceptualize and operationalize compassion from the perspective of individuals who are exposed and are challenged to address suffering on a frequent basis. This study will generate a model illustrating the key care domains of compassionate care that healthcare providers need to be cognizant of in order to optimally deliver compassion. While compassion is particularly salient to this population we believe the findings will be of relevance across oncology, BMT and hematology populations.

 

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Congratulations to Jason Berman from IWK on the receipt of a C17 Research Network grant targeting neuroblastoma

Grant title: The Microenvironment as a Therapeutic Target in High Risk Neuroblastoma

Lay abstract: Neuroblastoma is one of the most deadly cancers in children. While advances in treatment have made some improvements to survival, more than half of children will still die of disease. When neuroblastoma cells from the initial tumour move to another spot in the body and form another tumour, this is called metastasis and is particularly deadly. Thus, being able to stop cancer cells from spreading to organs like the bone, bone marrow and brain is critical to impacting survival of these vulnerable children. The spread of cancer cells is not only dependent on the cancer cell itself, but also on factors in the surrounding environment, known as the tumour microenvironment. Determining how these factors contribute to the spread of neuroblastoma and either increasing or decreasing these levels could improve current neuroblastoma treatment. We have developed approaches to transplant human cancer cells into zebrafish embryos, which are see-through and have similar cells and organs as humans, providing an environment not dissimilar from what occurs when these cancer cells arise in children. We have further “humanized” these zebrafish by altering them to express certain human factors produced by cells found around cancer cells that may contribute to their movement. We will put human neuroblastoma cells into zebrafish and determine which factors outside and inside the cells affect where these cells travel. Information from these studies will provide guidance as to what factors to block or increase to prevent neuroblastoma spread and improve outcome.

 

Congratulations to Ted Gerstle from the Sick Kids Research Institute on the receipt of a 100% Fund grant targeting rhabdomyosarcoma

Grant title: MRI-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound-controlled hyperthermia to activate thermosensitive liposomal doxorubicin to treat rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) in a mouse model

Lay abstract: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the most common muscle tumor of childhood, can be difficult to treat because of the side-effects of radiation and surgery in certain locations as well as the long term toxicity of chemotherapy agents. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be used to guide high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beams to warm the tissue at the tumor up to a temperature of 42C. We will combine this mild hyperthermia with administration of an encapsulated chemotherapy drug (doxorubicin) specifically designed to release the drug in tissue which has been heated to 42C. We will create rhabdomyosarcoma tumors in mice and treat them using the combined MR guided HIFU and thermosensitivie doxorubicin formulation. We hypothesize that this combined approach could reduce tumor growth and minimize the toxicity of the drug by focusing its release at the tumor and minimizing systemic drug levels. This preclinical project would form the basis for the translation of the use of MRgHIFU and thermosensitive doxorubicin treatment into the pediatric oncology clinic, offering a treatment that could prolong life for patients with rhabdomyosarcoma and significantly reduce morbidity. This approach would be safer than current therapy and would be an exciting translation of MRgHIFU and liposomal doxorubicin from adult to pediatric therapy expanding treatment options for this challenging disease.

Funding partners: Fight Like Mason Foundation, Team Naomi, Team Finn and Coast-to-Coast Against Cancer. 100% Fund grants are adjudicated and administered by the C17 Research Network.


Nearly one in five children diagnosed with cancer will not survive. For children with rare and hard to treat cancers, the odds can be far worse. The 100% Fund has been created to challenge these odds. Coast-to-Coast Against Cancer is partnering with Phoebe Rose Rocks Foundation, Fight Like Mason Foundation, Team Naomi, and Team Finn to help fund research for children and teens who do not, yet, have their cure.  The purpose of The 100% Fund is to target directly pediatric cancers that are rare and hard to treat—cancers that have not responded to available therapies. Projects can range from discovery to clinical trials, but must be targeted at delivering a treatment intervention. The goal is to fund research with the potential to deliver improved treatment and increased survival rates.

C17 Research Network Call for Nominations: Clinical Research – Stem Cell Transplantation. Due 31-Jan-2018. Click for application/nomination instructions

The C17 Research Network Committee is seeking applications for the position of Clinical Research – Stem Cell Transplantation (1 position).

Applicants should have experience in basic and clinical research who have established reputations in their respective fields, and who share a national vision for research. They will have an affiliation with one of the 17 centres or associated universities. Consideration will also be given to selecting members who represent large and small centres, and institutions across Canada.

We ask all who receive this call for nominations to help us to distribute it as widely as possible. Please forward the call for nominations to institutions, organizations and individuals who might be interested in posting and/or responding to it. 

Application instructions can be found in the following document:  Call for nominations Sept 2017

C17 Research Network Call for Nominations: Clinical Research – Stem Cell Transplantation. Due 31-Jan-2018. Click for application/nomination instructions

The C17 Research Network Committee is seeking applications for the position of Clinical Research – Stem Cell Transplantation (1 position).

Applicants should have experience in basic and clinical research who have established reputations in their respective fields, and who share a national vision for research. They will have an affiliation with one of the 17 centres or associated universities. Consideration will also be given to selecting members who represent large and small centres, and institutions across Canada.

We ask all who receive this call for nominations to help us to distribute it as widely as possible. Please forward the call for nominations to institutions, organizations and individuals who might be interested in posting and/or responding to it. 

Application instructions can be found in the following document:  Call for nominations Sept 2017

REMINDER: LOI for the C17 Research Network Operating and The 100% Fund C17 Grant (infant ALL, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma) competitions are due 14-Dec-2017 at 4pm MT

C17 announced on Oct-24 the inaugural round of The 100% Fund C17 Grant Competition and Round 21 of the C17 Research Network Operating Grant Competition.

The C17 Operating Grant Competition is focused on multicenter, multidisciplinary pediatric oncology/hematology research.

The purpose of The 100% Fund Grant Competition is to target directly pediatric cancers that are rare and hard to treat—cancers that have not responded to available therapies. Applications addressing the cancer types below will be considered for the fall 2017 competition.

In recognition of its 30th anniversary, Childhood Cancer Canadaestablished The 100% Fund to challenge the odds for children and teens who do not, yet, have their cure.

Please see the calls for LOI, LOI forms and C17 Award Guide linked below. The application form and guidance document also can be downloaded from the C17 website (www.c17.ca/council-and-administrators/research/) under Committees> Research Network. The submission deadline for C17 LOIs is December 14, 2017 at 4 PM MST.

Congratulations to Sumit Gupta (Sick Kids), Anthony Chan (McMaster) and Livia Garzia (McGill) on their newly awarded C17 and Ewing sarcoma research grants

The C17 Research Network announces the funding of the following 3 grants.

Livia Garzia, McGill University (Ewing sarcoma competition) was awarded $99,894 for her grant entitled “Functional genomics of metastatic Ewing sarcoma”

Sumit Gupta, The Hospital for Sick Children, was awarded $120,000 for his grant entitled “Healthcare utilization and costs associated with current and future treatment strategies for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Building a policy model for clinicians and funders”

Anthony Chan, McMaster University, was awarded $118,763 for his grant entitled “Understanding involvement in obstetric and neonatal decision making: a qualitative study to explore the experience, preferences and needs of parents of infants at risk or affected by moderate or severe hemophilia A or B”

 

 

 

C17 Call for LOI: The 100% Fund Grant Competition and the C17Operating Grant Competition

C17 is pleased to announce the inaugural round of The 100% Fund C17 Grant Competition and Round 21 of the C17 Research Network Operating Grant Competition.

The C17 Operating Grant Competition is focused on multicenter, multidisciplinary pediatric oncology/hematology research.

The purpose of The 100% Fund Grant Competition is to target directly pediatric cancers that are rare and hard to treat—cancers that have not responded to available therapies. Applications addressing the cancer types below will be considered for the fall 2017 competition.

In recognition of its 30th anniversary, Childhood Cancer Canada established The 100% Fund to challenge the odds for children and teens who do not, yet, have their cure.

Please see the calls for LOI, LOI forms and C17 Award Guide linked below. The application form and guidance document also can be downloaded from the C17 website (www.c17.ca/council-and-administrators/research/) under Committees> Research Network. The submission deadline for C17 LOIs is December 14, 2017 at 4 PM MST.

 

C17 Research Network Call for Nominations: Clinical Research – Stem Cell Transplantation. Due 31-Oct-2017. Click for application/nomination instructions

The C17 Research Network Committee is seeking applications for the position of Clinical Research – Stem Cell Transplantation (1 position).

Applicants should have experience in basic and clinical research who have established reputations in their respective fields, and who share a national vision for research. They will have an affiliation with one of the 17 centres or associated universities. Consideration will also be given to selecting members who represent large and small centres, and institutions across Canada.

We ask all who receive this call for nominations to help us to distribute it as widely as possible. Please forward the call for nominations to institutions, organizations and individuals who might be interested in posting and/or responding to it. 

Application instructions can be found in the following document:  Call for nominations Sept 2017

 

NEW C17 GRANT COMPETITION —The 100% Fund. Watch for a call for applications in the areas of infant ALL, rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma (click to read more!)

We are thrilled to announce a new C17 grant competition that will be run in addition to our regular C17 Operating Grant completion.  Watch for a call for Letters of Intent* this month!

Nearly one in five children diagnosed with cancer will not survive. For children with rare and hard to treat cancers, the odds can be far worse.

The 100% Fund has been created to challenge these odds. In recognition of its 30th anniversary, Childhood Cancer Canada (CCC) is proud to partner with organizations with a shared passion to help fund research for children who do not, yet, have their cure.   The list is growing, but confirmed organizations as of September 12th are:

By building on new and exciting research initiatives in Canada and around the world, The 100% Fund (www.the100pfund.ca) will pave the way for collaborative research into cutting-edge therapies for tumours that have not responded to currently available treatments.

CCC will partner with C17 Council and its C17 Research Network to administer the grants. As a national research organization representing leading pediatric oncology programs across Canada, the experts at the C17 know the priorities of children and their families that have been impacted by childhood cancer.

* Applications will include a full letter of intent with a 3 page research proposal.  Successful LOI will advance to the full grant application stage.  Applicants not funded in the funding round currently in progress will be able to submit to this upcoming competition.